Self Discipline is the ability to get yourself to take action—to do what you need to do—regardless of your physical, mental, or emotional state. Everything you want in your life—everything you want to have, be, and do depends on your ability to get yourself to take the necessary actions to achieve your goals, whether  you feel like it or not, which is why the developing extraordinary self-discipline is arguably the #1 most important commitment you can make to yourself, right now.

That is why, as I was designing the curriculum for my brand new V.I.P. Mastermind Coaching program, it didn’t take me more than a minute to decide that Module #1 would be the topic (and title) of this blog post.

 

Imagine what you could accomplish if you could simply get yourself to follow through on your best intentions, no matter what. Picture yourself saying to your body, “Body, you’re overweight. I want you to lose 20 pounds.”  Without self-discipline that intention won’t lead to actions. But with sufficient self-discipline, it’s a done deal.

The pinnacle of self-discipline is when you reach the point that when you make a conscious decision, it’s virtually guaranteed you’ll follow through on it. But how?

Secret #1: Start Small, Stay Consistent

In my new book, I talked extensively about one of the primary causes of mediocrity, which robs us of our self-discipline: Isolating Incidents. We do this when we mistakenly assume that each choice we make, and each individual action we take, is only affecting that particular moment, or circumstance.

We must realize that the real impact and consequence of each of our choices and actions—and even our thoughts—is monumental, because every single thought, choice, and action is determining who we are becoming, which will ultimately determine the quality of our lives.  As T. Harv Ecker said in his best-selling book Secrets of the Millionaire Mind, “How you do anything is how you do everything.”

Every time you choose to do the easy thing, instead of the right thing, you are shaping your identity, becoming the type of person who does what’s easy, rather than what’s right.

On the other hand, when you do choose to do the right thing and follow through with your commitments—especially when you don’t feel like it—you are developing the extraordinary self-discipline (which most people never develop) necessary for creating extraordinary results in your life.

Start small, stay consistent. Choose just ONE activity that you haven’t been being self-disciplined with (waking up on time, going to the gym, calling prospects, etc.) and make the commitment to simply do it consistently (i.e. everyday) for the next 30 days. Keep reminding yourself that everything that you do affects who you’re becoming, which is determining the life that you will ultimately create and live.

When you see the big picture you start to take the alarm clock more seriously. When the buzzer goes off in the morning and you’re tempted to snooze, you start thinking, “Wait—this is not who I want to become—someone who doesn’t even have enough self-discipline to get out of bed in the morning! I’m getting up now, because I am committed to developing the discipline I need to be to create the life I want.”

Always remember that who you’re becoming is far more important than what you’re doing, and yet it is what you’re doing that is determining who you’re becoming.

Question: Which area(s) of your life or work are you already exceptionally self-disciplined in? Which area(s) are you committed to improving? You can leave a comment below, and I’ll be sure to respond…